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"Thou hast given a banner to them that fear thee..." Psalm 60:4

Who are Christ’s Enemies?
By Al Stoner

A Psalm of David. The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool (Ps. 110:1).

Does the Lord Jesus Christ have enemies?  No doubt, many religious people have never given themselves to considering matters such as this. One only has to have a minimal of familiarity with the four gospels to be brought face to face with the fact that He did, and does, have enemies.  In Psalm 110, as well as several other of the Psalms, Christ's enemies are identified.  Let us consider for a few moments this matter, and then examine ourselves to see where we stand with regard to the Savior.  Are we truly "with Him", or are we "against Him"? (Mt. 12:30). 
Christ's enemies are those who stand in opposition to the purpose of God in salvation.  " . . . rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry" (I Sam. 15:13).  The sin of Adam and Eve (whom God had clothed with coats of skins) was not as the sin of Cain, who slew his brother Abel, and subsequently "went out from the Presense of LORD".  
The sin of Nadab and Abihu was not the same as the sin of Aaron when he made the golden calf.  The sin of Korah and those who rebelled with him was not as the sin  of Aaron and Miriam (who were chastened and received back).
The sins of "the guilty" (Exod. 34:7) were not the same as the sins of those who had committed iniquity, transgression, and sin, for whom God had made provision for recovery by the shedding of blood.  
The sin of the ten spies who brought back an evil report was not the same as the sin of one who had committed some moral infraction against the Law of Moses. The sin of those who openly opposed the holy Prophets, such as Jeremiah and others, were not the same as those who had sinned, and come short of the glory of God.
The sin of Judas Iscariot, who betrayed the Lord, was in quite a different category in the mind of God than the sin of Peter, who denied the Lord thrice.  Denial is not the same as betrayal.
The sin of the kings of the earth and the rulers who rose up and took counsel together against the LORD, and against His Christ fall into this category of rebellion.  
The sin of the evil men crept in unawares, against which both Jude and Peter warned and admonished, whose damnation of a long time slumbereth not are also similar to what we are speaking of here.  The sins of Hymeneus and Philetus and of Alexander the coppersmith are other examples.  The sin of Diotrophes (III Jn. 9) falls into this category as well.
The sin of rebellion and opposition is not the same as the sin of failure and neglect.  
All transgression is not the same as "the great transgression" (Ps. 19:13).  All sin and blasphemy are not the same as the "the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit".
Wickedness, which speaks of a open rejection of, and opposition to, the purpose of God in salvation by Christ Jesus.
With regard to the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, the Scriptures declared that "Christ died for sinners," and "Christ died for the ungodly," and "Christ died for us", and "Christ hath once suffered for sins, the Just for the unjust".  But it does not say that He died for the wicked, unless it be from the greater perspective that He died for all.  
When the Scripture speaks of Christ dying for sinners, it is to the end that the sinners may be recovered from their sin.  But God has no remedy for wicked personalities, unless they repent.
The "ungodly" and the "sinners" for whom Christ is declared to have died, are those who have humbled themselves before Him, and are taking hold of the salvation that He is bringing to believing men and women
of David. The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool (Ps. 110:1).
Christ's enemies are those who stand in opposition to the purpose of God in salvation.  " . . . rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry" (I Sam. 15:13).  The sin of Adam and Eve (whom God had clothed with coats of skins) was not as the sin of Cain, who slew his brother Abel, and subsequently "went out from the Presense of LORD".  
The sin of Nadab and Abihu was not the same as the sin of Aaron when he made the golden calf.  The sin of Korah and those who rebelled with him was not as the sin  of Aaron and Miriam (who were chastened and received back).
The sins of "the guilty" (Exod. 34:7) were not the same as the sins of those who had committed iniquity, transgression, and sin, for whom God had made provision for recovery by the shedding of blood.  
The sin of the ten spies who brought back an evil report was not the same as the sin of one who had committed some moral infraction against the Law of Moses. The sin of those who openly opposed the holy Prophets, such as Jeremiah and others, were not the same as those who had sinned, and come short of the glory of God.
The sin of Judas Iscariot, who betrayed the Lord, was in quite a different category in the mind of God than the sin of Peter, who denied the Lord thrice.  Denial is not the same as betrayal.
The sin of the kings of the earth and the rulers who rose up and took counsel together against the LORD, and against His Christ fall into this category of rebellion.  
The sin of the evil men crept in unawares, against which both Jude and Peter warned and admonished, whose damnation of a long time slumbereth not are also similar to what we are speaking of here.  The sins of Hymeneus and Philetus and of Alexander the coppersmith are other examples.  The sin of Diotrophes (III Jn. 9) falls into this category as well.
The sin of rebellion and opposition is not the same as the sin of failure and neglect.  
All transgression is not the same as "the great transgression" (Ps. 19:13).  All sin and blasphemy are not the same as the "the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit".
Wickedness, which speaks of a open rejection of, and opposition to, the purpose of God in salvation by Christ Jesus.
With regard to the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, the Scriptures declared that "Christ died for sinners," and "Christ died for the ungodly," and "Christ died for us", and "Christ hath once suffered for sins, the Just for the unjust".  But it does not say that He died for the wicked, unless it be from the greater perspective that He died for all.  
When the Scripture speaks of Christ dying for sinners, it is to the end that the sinners may be recovered from their sin.  But God has no remedy for wicked personalities, unless they repent.
The "ungodly" and the "sinners" for whom Christ is declared to have died, are those who have humbled themselves before Him, and are taking hold of the salvation that He is bringing to believing men and women
of David. The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool (Ps. 110:1).
Christ's enemies are those who stand in opposition to the purpose of God in salvation.  " . . . rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry" (I Sam. 15:13).  The sin of Adam and Eve (whom God had clothed with coats of skins) was not as the sin of Cain, who slew his brother Abel, and subsequently "went out from the Presense of LORD".  
The sin of Nadab and Abihu was not the same as the sin of Aaron when he made the golden calf.  The sin of Korah and those who rebelled with him was not as the sin  of Aaron and Miriam (who were chastened and received back).
The sins of "the guilty" (Exod. 34:7) were not the same as the sins of those who had committed iniquity, transgression, and sin, for whom God had made provision for recovery by the shedding of blood.  
The sin of the ten spies who brought back an evil report was not the same as the sin of one who had committed some moral infraction against the Law of Moses. The sin of those who openly opposed the holy Prophets, such as Jeremiah and others, were not the same as those who had sinned, and come short of the glory of God.
The sin of Judas Iscariot, who betrayed the Lord, was in quite a different category in the mind of God than the sin of Peter, who denied the Lord thrice.  Denial is not the same as betrayal.
The sin of the kings of the earth and the rulers who rose up and took counsel together against the LORD, and against His Christ fall into this category of rebellion.  
The sin of the evil men crept in unawares, against which both Jude and Peter warned and admonished, whose damnation of a long time slumbereth not are also similar to what we are speaking of here.  The sins of Hymeneus and Philetus and of Alexander the coppersmith are other examples.  The sin of Diotrophes (III Jn. 9) falls into this category as well.
The sin of rebellion and opposition is not the same as the sin of failure and neglect.  
All transgression is not the same as "the great transgression" (Ps. 19:13).  All sin and blasphemy are not the same as the "the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit".
Wickedness, which speaks of a open rejection of, and opposition to, the purpose of God in salvation by Christ Jesus.
With regard to the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, the Scriptures declared that "Christ died for sinners," and "Christ died for the ungodly," and "Christ died for us", and "Christ hath once suffered for sins, the Just for the unjust".  But it does not say that He died for the wicked, unless it be from the greater perspective that He died for all.  
When the Scripture speaks of Christ dying for sinners, it is to the end that the sinners may be recovered from their sin.  But God has no remedy for wicked personalities, unless they repent.
The "ungodly" and the "sinners" for whom Christ is declared to have died, are those who have humbled themselves before Him, and are taking hold of the salvation that He is bringing to believing men and women.